Nicolas Sarkozy became the first sitting president to lose the first round of a presidential election. 60 Minutes made both the top brass of Lehman Brothers and the SEC look a whole lot like criminals. The Yankees embarrassed the Red Sox. And then the Yankees embarrassed the Red Sox. But according to an op-ed in Saturday’s New York Times, we likely didn’t talk about any of that over the weekend—at least not to each other.

We were too busy being alone, together…

DEATH OF THE CONVERSATION
It seemed a bit cliché to us at first, too, the whole “technology is making us less social” indictment. But something about psychologist and MIT professor Sherry Turkle’s piece “The Flight from Conversation” in Saturday’s New York Times struck a chord. “Always-on/always-on-you devices,” Ms. Turkle explains, “provide three powerful fantasies: that we will always be heard; that we can put our attention wherever we want it to be; and that we never have to be alone.” Join us in perpetuating this fantasy by reading on…


LEHMAN BROTHERS AND THE SHELL GAME
It was the largest bankruptcy in history—larger than General Motors, Washington Mutual, Enron and WorldCom combined. And yet, it seemed to happen overnight. As we learned from the lead story on 60 Minutes last night, that’s because the bank transferred $50 billion of its debt oversees every year for one week per year—y’know, the week when all the money was counted.

RED (IN THE FACE) SOX
To say that the season didn’t start off well for the Boston Red Sox would be like saying the passage didn’t end well for the Titanic. And still, one day after the Yankees smacked five homers to piss on Fenway Park’s 100th birthday party, and one day before Fenway Park was actually pissed on by Mother Nature, thereby postponing the series finale, it seemed the Sox were finally coming around: they were up 9-0, after all. But then the Yankees scored 15 runs in three innings and won the game 15-9.

Here’s to not being Bobby Valentine this week.

—C.B.S.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • C. Brian Smith