Now that the dust has settled on Sunday’s Ravens-Patriots game, it’s time we took a closer look at its lexical legacy—the word “cundiff.”

Thanks to Billy Cundiff’s game-losing missed kick from just 32 yards out, the surname has taken on a life of its own, a brand-new word with unique meaning: inexplicably failing at a routine task, with catastrophic consequences.

Suddenly, we’re hearing it everywhere—not surprising, since it happens all the time. And to show how useful the new piece of vocab truly is, we’ve put together a few prime examples after the jump…

A few examples:

In Political Commentary:
Coming out of New Hampshire, Romney’s victory seemed all but assured—and yet, in the past two weeks, he’s managed to cundiff his lead.

In Restaurant Criticism:
How do you cundiff a ham sandwich? It’s just ham, mustard and bread.

In Movie Reviews:
I wanted to like The Tree of Life, but the Sean Penn parts cundiffed the whole movie for me.

In Profound Metaphysical Inquiry:
We truly experience the world only when we are thrust into chaos, powerless before the arbitrariness of the world. It is only when we cundiff that we truly live.

In Aphorism: It is better to try and cundiff than never to try.

—R.B.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Russell Brandom