Summer Cabin

As connoisseurs of history, we sometimes find styles, habits and turns of phrase from the past that we wouldn’t mind bringing back to the present, Doc Brown-style. This time around, we’re dusting off the summer cabin.

Nowadays the words “summer vacation” usually imply a plane ticket to a southern island and an anonymous and freshly scrubbed hotel room. We’re not knocking it, but there was a time when those words meant something a bit more traditional, a bit more familial.

And the resulting few weeks were often spent in a cabin of some kind…

Someone’s grandfather had built the place with his bare hands, nestled on some lake or river a full day’s drive from the nearest town. There were no creature comforts to speak of—no microwaves, just a stove and whatever supplies you hauled into the woods. You’d spend most of your waking hours outdoors, hiking, canoeing, or whittling on the back porch watching the river laze by until it was time to gather wood for the night’s fireside get-together.

Now that we’ve finally endured the more hellish-temperatured stretch of summer, the time might be right for a Nick Adams inspired weekend of strong drink and story swapping over a crackling fire.

And a piece of land and a miter saw is looking like a stronger investment by the day.

—N.B.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Najib Benouar