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Your Latest Dose of Gatsby

  • Kempt Staff

We’ve said it before, but Hollywood’s been coming up handsome these days.

And even though we originally thought we’d get to see Baz Luhrmann’s neo-Gatsby this weekend, it’s been pushed back to next summer. So instead, we’ll have to settle for these recently released film posters—more evidence of all the literary good-looking-ness to come. We couldn’t be more excited. (A three-piece tweed suit can do that to us...) And don’t worry, you’ll still get your fill of rakish Leonardo DiCaprio this Christmas.

See the rest of the cast of well-heeled dandies and flappers after the jump.»

Tobey Maguire and the Succès de Scandale

We’d like to congratulate Tobey Maguire on a scandal well played.

As we learned a few months ago, Maguire was said to be participating in high-stakes card games run by con man Bradley Ruderman and a made-for-Page-Six bombshell named Molly Bloom. Now, he’s agreed to pay back $80,000 (of the more than $300,000 that he won) to settle a lawsuit brought by a group of investors who had been bilked by Ponzi-schemer Ruderman.

In Maguire's case, it's what we call the good kind of controversy. Here's why»

The Kempt Guide to the September Issues

Esquire September Issue

As you may have noticed from the stack of glossy pages threatening to break your coffee table, it’s time for the September issues—the print-world primer for everything that happens in style for the next six months.

So we took it upon ourselves to methodically flip through GQ, Esquire and Details (which add up to roughly the page count of Crime and Punishment) and provide scientific analysis.

Brace yourselves…»

The Fischer Boom


If you didn’t recognize the well-dressed man in the picture, he’s the grandmaster of grandmasters, Bobby Fischer, and you may be hearing a lot more about him in the months ahead.

Word leaked today that Tobey Maguire’s producing a film version of the Fischer’s 1972 match with Boris Spassky—quite possibly the most dramatic moment of his career—and it might just the posthumous revival that chess’s most famous disappearing act needs.

In praise of Mr. Fischer»