Kempt

world of men's style / fashion / grooming

An UrbanDaddy Publication

Head to Toe: Rainproof

  • Najib Benouar

040714_Rainproof_5

April showers are here—which means it’s in your best interest to wear as much water-resistant clothing as possible.

Luckily the recent tech-meets-tailoring boom in menswear has turned out a handsome lot of gear that wouldn’t look out of place when swapped into your everyday getup. So we picked out the best new stuff for spring—though we wouldn’t advise wearing it all at once.

Rainproofing your wardrobe from head to toe.»

Weathering a Hurricane in Style

  • Najib Benouar

A superstorm... the Frankenstorm... Sandy.

Whatever you’re calling the hurricane headed toward the Northeast this weekend, things are promising to get very wet, very quickly. So to weather this storm—and the ever-looming danger of torrential downpour this time of year—we’ve come up with a few integral upgrades to your rain gear that should keep you stylishly dry without looking like a rain-slicker-wrapped Gorton’s Fisherman (though not a bad last-minute Halloween costume idea). Even if that means braving a few errant drops or an oversized puddle—and taking it all in stride.

Upping your rain gear in five easy steps, courtesy of Kempt.»

An M-65 Jacket for Your Legs

  • Najib Benouar

Unlike most labels trading on tech fabrics, Outlier makes the sort of stuff that doesn’t look anything out of the ordinary—menswear staples cut from a different cloth.

These Nyco Slims are their latest entry—made from a surplus stock of Nyco (that’s half nylon, half cotton) used by the military to make the legendary M-65 jackets. The material is tough as nails and the cut gives them the look of your favorite pair of chinos (which they will be soon enough).

Consider them the moleskin trousers of the future.

Off the Cuff

Outlier

Outlier’s mostly known for bike-friendly pants, but they’ve finally turned out a shirt we’d be interested in wearing without any wheeled accompaniment.

The shirt is a handsome deep blue linen blend, but the real feature is the clever design. Look closely and you’ll notice something missing: specifically no collar and no cuffs. It’s as if they’ve been ripped straight off the shirt. (Possibly by a bike chain…but we won’t speculate.)

It’s an elegant, minimalist touch, and one that would look pretty sharp underneath a khaki blazer. Gentlemen, go forth.

The Waterproof Sneaker

submarineshoes_crop.jpg

Around this time of year, when snow turns to slush, it’s good to have something waterproof over your feet. Your options usually boil down to heavy leather boots and some variety of galosh, but the folks at Outlier have an interesting twist on the predicament: the waterproof sneaker.

They’re made from dense Egyptian cotton, which is treated with a synthetic water resistant for a less clammy version of the traditional waxed cotton. There’s a double layer of French calf leather inside and most surprisingly, a Goodyear Welt underneath everything, so you’ll be able to resole it if the vibram sole wears down after a few years. The result is a pair of shoes that look like Vans but kick through slush like Red Wings. They’re on pre-order now, but they should be shipping out by the end of February—just in time for the rainy season.

Outliers

outliers3_crop.jpg

Since the bicycle was invented, bike clothes have been uniformly embarrassing, and with bikes and scooters on the rise, it seems like material-minded designers have their work cut out for them.

These aren’t perfect, but they meet the challenge of producing a good biking pant better than anything else we’ve seen. They come from Outliers, a brand-new Brooklyn marque devoted to performance over form. In this case, that means pants that repel water, grease and stains and can stand up to the grinding gears of the average bike commute. It’s mountain climber stuff, but they’ve managed to fashion it into a slim pant that won’t look out of place at the office. It’s hardly a triumph of style, but as far as bike-safe clothing goes, it's a big leap forward

More close-ups after the jump»