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The New Yorker Archive’s Five Best Style Reads

  • Kempt Staff


We mentioned this a couple weeks ago when it happened, but we finally had some time to really dig deep into the newly unveiled New Yorker Archive recently and found a handful of stylish reads.

From Capote profiling Brando in 1957 to a 2010 visit to the Prince of Solomeo, otherwise known as Brunello Cucinelli, here are the five handsomest long-reads from the New Yorker Archive...»

Style Icons Wearing Undershirts


Here’s a little history lesson for you: plain white T-shirts first appeared in the late 19th century, when some manufacturer decided to split the union suit into separates. And originally, they were meant to protect one’s finer outer layers from the perils of, well, sweat.

Like boxers for your chest.

But the rules have changed in the past century. The undershirt has, on occasion, been called to take sartorial center stage. Like before bed. Or between takes on set. Or during takes, for that matter. And throughout it all, some brave, overtly stylish men have succeeded in proving that these baser layers can be worth way more than their thread count.

So we’ve assembled the finest moments in Style Icons Wearing Undershirts for you, after the jump.»

Dusting Off: The Politically Charged Oscars Speech

  • Najib Benouar


Before the advent of the 24-hour news cycle and Twitter, a movie star’s biggest offscreen stage was an awards show podium.

And there was none grander than the Oscars. So if a celebrity wanted to unequivocally take their stance on the current state of government, war, immigration, gay rights or what have you, they’d have to win first—then decide whether it was more important to thank the list of people who got them there or go off-book on some rant that would surely ruffle a few feathers. (Or, in the case of Marlon Brando, send up a Native American woman to decline accepting the award on his behalf.)

It made for the sort of incredibly surreal moment that we’ve been seeing less and less of lately. And that’s a shame. So, in honor of those sometimes patronizing, sometimes endearing and always overly passionate moments of stardom, we’d like to look back at a few of the finer exhibitions of celebrity political grandstanding.

Let’s go to the video, shall we.»

Style Icons Rallying for Civil Rights

  • Najib Benouar

The civil rights movement was born out of an ugly time in US history, but we’ll be damned if it didn’t make for some good-looking protesters.

With the always-impeccable Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leading the way, a sea of crisp suits, skinny ties and Wayfarers led our country into equality. In honor of the great man and movement, we dug through the archives and were surprised to find a handsome lot of style icons also heading up the charge for civil rights—a veritable who’s who of impossibly cool gentlemen—everyone from Brando and Newman to Belafonte, Dylan and Davis Jr. Hell, even Charlton Heston got in on the action. It’s as if somehow impassioned, selfless endeavoring has a way of adding an extra layer of dapperness—not to mention being on the right side of history.

Now presenting: A Pictorial Demonstration of Style Icons Rallying for Civil Rights.»

Do Not Fear the Turtleneck

  • Najib Benouar

The turtleneck. It’s a statement, for sure—and not the easiest one to make without verging on creepy Euro-beanik, or for lack of a better word: dweeby.

The trick is to avoid some common pitfalls—wearing something too gauzy, too tight or with a maniacally steadfast gaze. There’s a sweet spot in the middle there. And we’re going to help you find it, by taking some subtle cues from some of the most stylish guys to ever do it.

And now, a master class in the turtleneck, courtesy of five icons of style.»

A Salute to the Stunt Doubles of Style Icons...

Sean Connery with stunt double Big John McLaughlin, Never Say Never Again, 1983

When the city of Fort Lauderdale recognized Big John McLaughlin, Shogun of the Sea, with a star on the Walk of Fame earlier this year, he responded, “Does one have to be alive to collect it?” It likely was not the first time Mr. McLaughlin asked some form of this question, having pioneered diving, stunt rigging and motion picture safety techniques in the late 1950s that are still in use to this day. Jaws simply wouldn’t have been a scary movie if it weren’t for Big John.

“I guess the craziest thing they ever asked me to do was bite a live tiger shark,” he reminisces. But his favorite was doubling 007 in eight Bond films, including Thunderball, in which he doubled 34 different people.

Allow us to join the city of Fort Lauderdale in raising a glass to Big John, the Shogun, and all the brave men who have kept our precious style icons safe over the years. To that end, we close the week with...

A salute to the stunt doubles of style icons.»

The Docks


This handsome two-color screenprint comes from Alamo Drafthouse’s Rolling Roadshow screening series, which had the brilliant idea of screening On the Waterfront on August 20th at the same Hoboken docks where it was filmed.

They also picked up some ad love and industrial cred from co-sponsor Levi's...which might explain all the attention being paid to Brando’s note-perfect buffalo plaid jacket on the poster. (The revolver’s an optional accessory.)