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The Hurried Man’s Guide to the Playoffs, Part I


Feel that? That’s the one-day breather between the baseball season (which ended yesterday) and the baseball playoffs (which start tomorrow). If you haven’t been paying attention, fear not: you can still sound smart, thanks to our quick-and-dirty guide to the playoffs.

That guide is right this way...»

The Cautionary Tales of the Jheri Curl

  • Kempt Staff

Jheri curl

If you haven’t caught the trailer for American Hustle yet, it’s a fever dream of ’70s excess—with giant floppy collars, Jennifer Lawrence and Amy Adams wearing a lot of fur and a very-tightly-curled-coifed Bradley Cooper. In one scene, he’s even shown donning pink rollers (possibly borrowed from Dock Ellis’s locker) to achieve the look.

That’s right, Coop gets the Jheri curl treatment. Which reminded us of that fateful hairdo and all of the misguided souls who fell victim to the allure of glossy curls in the past. Justin Timberlake, A.C. Slater, Lionel Richie, Darryl Jenks. The list goes on and on.

The moral of the story: it never ends well.»

Grooming Tips from the Man Who Tamed Wolverine’s Muttonchops

Men's Groomer

With The Wolverine hitting theaters this weekend, Hugh Jackman has been doing the press rounds. And he’s been doing so while magnificently well-coifed.

In other words: not looking a thing like the terrifyingly hirsute beast he plays in the movie.

But Hugh doesn’t just roll out of bed looking that good—the man behind turning Wolverine back into a normal-looking person is a guy who goes by “The Men’s Groomer,” Jason Schneidman. We caught up with Jason, who’s working with Dove Men+ Care, to talk beard maintenance, re-handsome-ing up Hugh Jackman, how to get the JFK cut and more.

Jason Schneidman on the perils of grooming Wolverine, turning Rob Lowe into JFK and Abe Lincoln’s terrible chinstrap.»

Before They Were Bald

Andre Agassi

There are some things that have been proven to get better with time. Wine. Cheese. Cindy Crawford. But some, well, some just get balder.

It’s a plight that a great many men have fallen victim to, this thinning up top. Or, should we also say, many great men. And for a select lucky few of them, these physical recessions have had no accompanying effects on their professional lives. In fact, in some cases, it could probably be argued that an increasingly exposed dome only contributed to further career successes.

Not that we’d wish such follicular challenges on anyone. We’re just saying there are worse things.

So now join us as we take a look back at some of history’s greatest “cue balls”—before we had the pleasure of calling them that—after the jump...»

This Is Going to Be a Long Dinner Party

  • Kempt Staff

via Fashion Faves

Face Time: A forehead-to-chin grooming guide that also includes a hearty helping of beer. [GQ]

It’s About to Go Down: How to buy a round at the bar—whether you’re celebrating tonight or not. [Art of Manliness]

Getting Posterized: Bond-mania is reaching a fever pitch as Friday’s Skyfall premiere nears—and Gear Patrol has stumbled upon an auction of historic movie posters. [Gear Patrol]

The Art of Warlords: And in an auction just passed, Selectism finds some handsome samurai armor. [Selectism]

Movember, Circa 1947

  • Najib Benouar

We’ve seen a sharp rise in the semiserious celebration of the mustache—from finger tattoos, to the charitable monthlong growing contest known as Movember—and all this time we thought it was a relatively new phenomenon...

Until we stumbled upon this cache of photos from the inaugural meeting of the “Handlebar Club” at London’s Windmill Theatre. In 1947. That’s right, a slapstick crew of mustachioed men began a club dedicated to mustaches (beards strictly disallowed) nearly 70 years ago. They even went so far as to print mustaches on their silk ties (somebody write that idea down). Not to mention, it’s a surprisingly handsome lot of hirsute upper lips—which we’ll assume took longer than a month to grow.

And now, seven more photos of the pioneering men who dedicated themselves to the art of mustache celebration well before any of us thought of it...»