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Horse Opera

People usually use “western style” to mean nudie suits and mother-of-pearl snap buttons, but there’s a real way of life behind the phrase. For instance, the gentleman in the tintype...

Aside from the wide-brim hat—which most trail men needed for survival—the real western style meant a sense of rugged formality. Just because his shoes are dirty doesn’t mean he can’t wear a waistcoat. And while these clothes have seen a lot of sand and dust, they were made to last, and they’ll stand up under any conditions.

The sloppy scarf-tie may not have aged particularly well, we’d say the overall look has lasted better than most.

Almost Blue


Our latest favorite selvedge shirt comes from the Tokyo label 12-bar. Normally we’d steer clear of the western look, but this shirt manages to do it exactly to the limit. There are snaps but no arrows, and the discreet white piping wisely steers clear of nudie suit territory.

The herringbone fabric gives the fabric some texture, and the denim-blue keeps everything in manageably urban territory. This is how cowboys dress in Tokyo.

The Shirt that Tamed the West


If Mr. Sayler’s namecheck has you wondering what Pendleton looks like, this is a pretty good specimen.

Western shirts aren’t exactly on trend these days, but that mostly applies to the exaggerated cowboy version. Pendleton is too much of a heritage brand to focus on things like trends, or even much marketing for that matter.

As a result, this shirt isn’t that different from the ones they were churning out ten years ago—that is, the ones that started the trend in the first place.

Zooey, Boats and Cowboy Shirts


The Eyes!: Nylon turns its lens to Ms. Zooey Deschanel. Yes, we’re still listening to that album. [FashionIndie]

Highlights for Kids: A field guide to the hairstyles of the tasteless. [Men.Style]

Cowboy Up Yet Again: A longform journalist peeks into the troubled soul of the inventor of the cowboy shirt. [Design Observer]

On Sail: A boat catalog circa 1969, with only the best in nautical graphic design.[A Continuous Lean]