Kempt

world of men's style / fashion / grooming

An UrbanDaddy Publication

Keira Knightley Never Understood Sleeves

Table It: The 10 oversized books you should consider for yourself or anyone else you know who might already own a coffee table. [Highsnobiety]

Fast Backlash: An op-ed that makes the case against the new trend of fast fashion collaborations. [Business of Fashion]

Blitzkrieg Bop: Popular ladies’ e-commerce site Shopbop has set their sights on the menswear market. [Fashionista]

A Love Pentagon: To add to the ever-evolving bizarreness surrounding General Petraeus, Chuck Klosterman somehow found himself briefly caught in the eye of the storm—and lived to tell his story. [Grantland]

Eliza Sys is Windswept

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The Essay Trade: You can now buy Chuck Klosterman essays iTunes-style for 99 cents a pop—in case you only really want to know what he thinks about Kiss. [Arts Beat]

There’s a Little Hobo in There Too: Zach Galifianakis defines his style as “community-college librarian.” Maybe he needs to hang out more with the GQ gents. [Vulture]

Jetpacks Included: Design guru Marc Newson’s latest exhibit includes a jetpack, a motorboat and a really ugly pair of shoes. But mostly the jetpack. [Cool Hunting]

Down Home: A gentleman’s guide to making moonshine. [Boing Boing]

Constance Jablonski is not to be Trifled With

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Knives Out: We’re not sure what she’s looking at, but we’re glad it’s not us. [Fashion Gone Rogue]

Silent Kids: Chuck Klosterman sits down with Stephen Malkmus, in what we can only assume was the most deadpan interview ever. [GQ]

Full Coverage: George Lois looks back on his favorite twelve covers, including Sonny Liston as Santa. [Vulture]

Matchstick Men: An exhaustive record of matchbooks handsome enough to make us cash in our Zippos. [The Matchbook Registry]

Chloe Sevigny is a Woman of Many Moods

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Another Day: AnOther Magazine celebrates a decade of style with attractive pictures of attractive women. Seems like as good a way as any. [Fashion Copious]

Meet the Beatles: Chuck Klosterman reviews the Beatles’ box set, possibly maxes out on the number of times you can say “unheralded” ironically in a single piece. [A. V. Club]

Dubaiers Beware: Another Dubai horror story, this time from a British architect. [Building]

Going Rogue, Again: Anyone ready to pick up gear on the internet should head to Rogues Gallery for up to 60% off Fall/Winter gear. [The Choosy Beggar]

China, My China

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Music criticism usually lands somewhere between snark and self-indulgence—neither one of which is that compelling—but every once in a while, the stars align and someone writes something so great it justifies the whole enterprise. And hopefully, it has a few jokes about Axl Rose’s corn rows.

The long-delayed Gun and Roses album Chinese Democracy is currently making the review circuit, and fate brought it into the pale hands of one Chuck Klosterman, an occasional Esquire essayist and all-around metal savant. In other words, it’s a dinosaur rock critic reviewing a dinosaur rock album, and they’re both giving it all they’ve got.

It might be the best record review we’ve ever read. You get the feeling that Klosterman spent a solid week listening to the album on repeat and drinking enough coffee to kill a horse. In his own words, “I've thought about this record more than I've thought about China, and maybe as much as I've thought about the principles of democracy.”

Don’t worry, Chuck. It shows.

We spoil the review by pull-quoting all the best lines»

Rogues, Showoffs and Fargo’s Finest

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Those Colors Don’t Screen: A quick, patriotic demonstration in screen-printing from the folks at Rogues Gallery. [A Continuous Lean]

We Hardly Knew Ya: Less than a week into unofficial presidency, Obama is already making JFK look bad. [Gawker]

The Pen is Mightier: Luxist counts down the ten most expensive writing instruments on Earth. But you’ll still lose it after a week. [Luxist]

But How Will it Play in Fargo?: Chuck Klosterman sets his sights on James Bond. Usually that works the other way around. [Esquire]