Kempt

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Do Not Fear the Turtleneck

  • Najib Benouar

The turtleneck. It’s a statement, for sure—and not the easiest one to make without verging on creepy Euro-beanik, or for lack of a better word: dweeby.

The trick is to avoid some common pitfalls—wearing something too gauzy, too tight or with a maniacally steadfast gaze. There’s a sweet spot in the middle there. And we’re going to help you find it, by taking some subtle cues from some of the most stylish guys to ever do it.

And now, a master class in the turtleneck, courtesy of five icons of style.»

Style Icons for George McGovern

Warren Beatty on the phone as he campaigns for Senator George McGovern’s Democratic presidential nomination.

Leading up to his 1972 presidential bid, Senator George McGovern, who died over the weekend at the age of 90, met with a group of Hollywood celebrities at the home of Shirley MacLaine. Since he was not well-known and had little support within the Democratic Party, it was decided that the entertainment industry could lend the McGovern campaign some much-needed credibility, charisma and cash.

And so a new generation of Hollywood liberal activists emerged, the first to do so since McCarthyite blacklists of the early ’50s had driven showbiz liberalism deep into the walk-in closets of Malibu and Mulholland Drive.

Warren Beatty, MacLaine’s brother, scheduled a series of high-profile concerts, fundraisers and East Hampton pickup baseball games, attended by the likes of Jack Nicholson, Burt Lancaster, Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight and so on. “We got involved because we were people who cared,” Norman Lear told The Hollywood Reporter on Sunday.

As such, we thought it a fitting tribute to the fallen senator to eulogize him in a pictorial we’re calling:

Style Icons for George McGovern...»

The Icon: Art Garfunkel

The ’70s get a bad rap.

We understand why. It was a time of excess and bad decisions, marked by nightclubs, drug use and immoderate lapel size—but it wasn’t all sleaze. In the background, almost unnoticed, there were a few wise souls playing out an honest, unpretentious style. They weren’t the front men, but the sidekicks: the Oateses, the Laceys, the Hutches...

And most of all, the Garfunkels.

A salute to the iconic Mr. Art Garfunkel...»