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Nowadays, going collarless tends to be a sign of schlubbiness—the first step on a long road towards sweatpants—but it doesn’t have to be that way. If you choose your crewnecks with enough care, and wear them with enough verve, it becomes a style all its own. Exhibit A: Pablo Picasso…

Perfectly Embodied:
From the boat neck to the nautical cuffs, you could wear this today and still count yourself ahead of the curve. If the folks at Rogues Gallery haven’t already seen this pic, they’ve been working from ones an awful lot like it. Throw in some St. James-style stripes and you’ve got half the nautical look in one Spanish painter.

Words of Wisdom:
You cannot go against nature. She is stronger than the strongest of men. We can permit ourselves some liberties, but in details only.

The Backstory:
In his younger days, he tried out the matador and brooding artist looks, but once he lost his hair, he shifted into more elemental form. In prime period, he seemed like a squat, immovable force of nature—only barely contained by clothing. That means a lot of shirtlessness, and a lot of time spent barefoot or in espadrilles, another often-copped Picasso trademark. As it happens, it’s a pretty good way to spend your next vacation. And, lest we forget, he also knew how to pull off a scarf

—R.B.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Russell Brandom