Aaron Taylor Johnson

We couldn’t help ourselves. With the Oscars only days away and awards season coming to a head, we felt honor-bound to weigh in on the subject of style, cinema and the intersection of the two.

So we collected our memories of the past year’s worth of handsomeness on film and tried to nail down exactly what made each film stylish—much like the actual Oscars, we’re breaking down the movie by individual garment performance, not just handing out awards willy-nilly.

So without further ado, the Oscar for Best Cardigan in a Supporting Role goes to…

 
Best Cardigan in a Supporting RoleCardiganNever has a cardigan been a better signifier for grandfatherly wisdom than on Caine in his perennial role as Alfred, opposite Christian Bale’s Bruce Wayne.

 
Best Three-Piece Suit in a Leading RoleSuitChanning Tatum had a banner year in 2012, but his finest fully clothed moment was in this chalk-striped three-piece suit. It’s about as dressed up as you can get during your own Hollywood-estimated hipster wedding, and not a bad option for anyone not going the tuxedo route.

 
Best Live-Action Fur-Trimmed CoatFur CoatThis was actually a tougher category to score than you’d expect, because Dark Knight Rises’s Bane had some strong competition from Anna Karenina’s Vronsky—but the slightly higher level of diabolicalness barely edged him out.

 
Special Achievement in Power-SuitingPower SuitYou don’t get to be a billionaire without a good supply of power suits, as evidenced by Richard Gere’s turn in Arbitrage (though getting there might also require some cooking of the books and covering up manslaughter).

 
Best Adapted Sweater-VestSweater VestThe Words may have left a lot to be desired—including an understandable plot and likeable protagonist—but Ben Barnes, in the maybe 10 minutes of non-depressing flashbacks to post-war France, was a beaming bright spot in this sweater-vest.

 
Best Foreign Object as VestmentForeign ObjectSometimes you’ve got to use what you’ve got, and what you’ve got isn’t all that much. We’d like to give Cooper this award for his heartbreaking ingenuity.

 
Best Visual Pattern-Use EffectsVisual PatternsRunners-up: Bill Murray, Moonrise Kingdom; John Hawkes, The Sessions

Hawkes may have the benefit of The Sessions’ 1980s setting on his side, and Bill Murray may be, well, Bill Murray, but neither pulls off strong patterns with as much sinister delight as DiCaprio’s Calvin Candie in Django Unchained. Any man who can casually wear a red silk paisley vest is a winner in our book.

 
Lifetime Tuxedo Achievement AwardTuxedoIn the words of Eva Green of Casino Royale (2006) fame, “There are dinner jackets and dinner jackets; this is the latter.”

—N.B. & S.P.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Najib Benouar
    Stephen Praetorius