1106KMT_Five_HED

Every Wednesday, we’re giving you a deeper look into what makes the minds behind Kempt tick. We call it: The Kempt Five.

Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin’. “Last night on PBS….. is usually how boring stories start. But hear me out: last night’s American Masters was a two-hour documentary on the greatest rock guitarist of all time, Mr. Jimi Hendrix. And while it suffered a bit from the usual Talking Heads Discussing a Great Dead Guy Syndrome, it was still well worth the time thanks to some amazing/rare footage, all of which reinforced that he wasn’t a living god but a man with demons and joy who played music exceptionally well. (And, oh yeah, apparently adopted his outré attire from a young age—one childhood friend mentions him fashioning a hat with a feather on it.) Well worth your time.

Bonus pro tip from an associate: check out the 1973 doc Hendrix for more where that came from, including some insane stories from Little Richard and Eric Clapton.” —P.L.U.

1106KMT_Five_1Mack Weldon Underwear and Socks. “Two caveats: 1, I’m not generally one to write about my underwear in public. 2, I’ve been the recipient of several free pairs of Mack Weldon underwear and socks, presumably for the sole purpose of getting me to write about them, and that’s usually a surefire way to ensure that I won’t write about them. But I’m reluctantly breaking those rules here. Mack’s boxers fit nice, feel nice and generally get the hoped-for reception from the few people who see me in them. The socks are fun and don’t slide down. To put it another way: I’d gladly pay retail for them.” —P.L.U.

Hyperbole and a Half, the Book. “A blog/web comic of deliberately childlike yet immensely expressive art that has left me in tears laughing on more than one occasion is finally available in actual holdable paper form. I feel like the site’s been around forever, but it’s only been a few years—perhaps a testament to how big an impression Allie Brosh’s work has left on me and others. (“This Is Why I’ll Never Be an Adult” has long spoken to me on a deep, personal, horrible level.) She disappeared from the Internet shortly after announcing that said book would be a thing, only to make a triumphant/hilarious/poignant return with a long post about the severe depression that caused her absence and the book’s delay. And now, the book has finally arrived, with old and new content alike. I’ve been trying not to tear through it, but who am I kidding—I’ll definitely be reading it many times over.” —J.R.

1106KMT_Five_2GANT Williamsburg. “As you’re probably aware, it opened this weekend. I was finally able to swing through last night, and yes—it’s awesome. Sort of a laid-back bistro meets a menswear general store: a gratis espresso counter encircled by racks of madras, knits and leathery miscellany under a suspended bar stocked with whiskey and limited-edition salsas. Definitely worth the trip across the bridge.” —C.G.

1106KMT_Five_3Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926–1938. “On exhibition now through January at the MoMA. I took this past Friday off for a bit of a staycation and was able to get uptown to check it out—and it’s spectacular. About 80 pieces spanning the decade prior to WWII with an emphasis on surreal metamorphosis. My favorites were a series of collages using nonsensical pieces of sheet music over oil paint. As an extension of the exhibit, conceptual artist Elaine Tin Nyo has partnered with MoMA chefs for “Edible Magritte”—a dinner series with dishes inspired by his work. The next one is coming up November 14. Strongly suggest checking both out.” —C.G.

CONTRIBUTORS

  • Caitlin Ganswindt
    Jessica Rusinak
    Paul L. Underwood